Jargon is the use of words to mean something other than their dictionary meaning. In this case the words Belgian Lace have little to do with the country mentioned or the fabric alluded to. Of course there is no doubt that fermented malt beverages brewed, fermented and packaged in Belgium may be endowed with “Belgian Lace” but it can also be found in British and North American ales, beers, porters and stout porters as well as German Wit beers and ales and Asian, African and South American lager-style brews.

The following are illustrations of the phenomena with the only three definitions available from the Ethernet. In closing I offer a link to my posting on the subject.

“Belgian lace is a term for the traces of foam left by the beer on the interior of the glass as it is consumed.”

“It can be thought of as a souvenir caused by the foamy head of a well-made beer and therefore acts as one indicator of its quality.”

Brewers Lair

“Belgian (or Brussels) lace: The latticework of foam from the head of the beer that is left on the glass after a drink of beer has been taken. Reflects both the care taken in brewing the beer and the cleanliness of the glass from which it is being served.”

Real Beer

“Belgian Lace: The beautiful, white latticework of foam from the head of the beer that is left on the glass after a sip of beer has been taken”

BeerTools Pro

 

Tatting Belgian Lace…   http://bit.ly/VHaoe2